end-of-2020 studio sale / fundraiser

Earlier this week, I posted some small sketches as an end of year studio sale and fundraiser for Bed-Stuy Strong and ISCP and wanted to share a little more about my connection to these two groups.

Bed-Stuy Strong is a neighborhood mutual aid network I have participated in since March thanks to a flyer posted outside a subway station. I’ve been donating, making some deliveries, and, lately, making calls to connect neighbors with groceries thanks to Bed-Stuy Strong’s organizers over the past eight months of the coronavirus crisis. I’m consistently amazed and moved by the love and support of my neighbors in this community.

ISCP (International Studio & Curatorial Program) is an arts org in Brooklyn which provides residencies for artists and curators from around the world as well as hosting exhibitions and public programs. It’s what brought me to New York in 2016 for a summer internship after finishing my BFA! Since then, I’ve stayed connected through volunteering at events and attending open studio nights.

To keep it simple everything is listed for $30 ($20 donated per sketch). Let me know if you have questions, or click here to read more. My big (!) goal is to raise $300 for each organization by the end of the year, and I’ll continue adding some more sketches to the sale page.

art online: October 2020

1.

My painting Untitled (Abstraction 5 of 7) is included in “Wild Lands”, curated by Gina Tuzzi. She writes, “Finding our place in the balance is one hell of a dance.” This online exhibition will be live through December 6, 2020.

You can view the exhibition on the Artist Alliance website.
> artistalliance.space/exhibitions/wild-lands

2.

For the second year in a row, I’m happy to have a piece in benefit art exhibition for the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts. My painting Return is included in this auction (with online bidding this year) from October 24-30. Proceeds support participating artists (like me!) as well as the Bemis Center’s programs.

You can view the exhibition / auction on the Bemis Center website.
> bemiscenter.org/benefit
(for direct link to my piece, click on the painting below. currently available at the “buy it now” price until bidding begins on the 24th.)

Ps. If you want to receive updates about new work and upcoming exhibitions occasionally throughout the year, join my email list! Here’s a sample that went out recently.

arts workers for Black lives

together with my colleagues at https://artsworkersforblacklives.com/


Open Letter from Arts and Cultural Workers of NYC, Demanding the Defunding of the Police and Investment in BIPOC Communities

attention:

Governor Andrew Cuomo
Mayor Bill de Blasio
Police Commissioner Dermot F. Shea
District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr.
District Attorney Eric Gonzalez
District Attorney Darcel Denise Clark
District Attorney Melinda Katz
District Attorney Michael McMahon

June 3rd, 2020

To the aforementioned:

As New York residents as well as artists, art writers, arts administrators, curators, and cultural workers, we are outraged not only at the last week of police brutality in response to protests, but also the centuries of systemic murder and oppression of our communities from overfunded and increasingly militarized police.

Last April, Mayor de Blasio proposed major budget cuts for the Fiscal Year 2021, especially to the arts, education, and youth programs, while refusing to slash the NYPD budget by any significant margin. We urge you to consider the ethical and equal reallocation of the NYC expense budget, away from the NYPD, and towards social and civic services and education programs, effective at the beginning of FY21, July 1st 2020.

We write in remembrance of Eric and Erica Garner. We write in remembrance of George Floyd. We write in remembrance of Breonna TaylorAhmaud ArberyTony McDadeNina Pop, and the millions of other Black women, men, queer, and trans people who, since the founding of this nation, have suffered systemic violence at the hands of police brutality. We write with our Black and brown communities in mind, who have suffered systemic underinvestment and oppression that have resulted in an overwhelming and disproportionate number of deaths from COVID-19.

In a time when it has become clearer and clearer that your policies and the policies of your predecessors have failed us, consistently compromising the safety and health of Black and brown people, we write to make a plea for you to act in solidarity with the ongoing Black and brown movements around the nation. As artists and arts workers, we have the responsibility of imagining and manifesting new and better worlds. In line with this work, we demand the immediate decrease of police presence in response to the #BlackLivesMatter protests, and subsequent Divestment from the Police and Investment in Black Communities.

Following the work of the national Movement for Black Lives, we repeat and unite with the following specific demands:

Respect the Rights of Protestors

We demand that no harm come to protestors. Violations of property should never be equated with the violation of human life and integrity. End the curfew and scale back police presence. Immediately ban the use of tear gas, a chemical weapon banned in warfare per the Chemical Weapons Convention of 1993.

Limit the spread of COVID-19, which your officers have not done enough to address. Your officers have not worn masks, and the doubling of police presence means the doubling of the chance of COVID spread not only in our communities, but among the police force itself. Reallocate the money you are using to mobilize the police toward obtaining and distributing PPE and other medical equipment for hospitals and our communities.

End the War Against Black People

We call for not just individual accountability of officers after a murder, but entire police departments. We demand an end to the criminalization, incarceration, and killing of our people.

Suspend the use of administrative leave for cops under investigation. Withhold pensions and don’t rehire cops involved in excessive force. Require cops to be liable for misconduct and settlements. Withdraw participation in police militarization programs.

Community Control

Hold the NYPD immediately accountable by external community reviews. The most impacted in our communities need to control the laws, institutions, and policies that are meant to serve us, from our schools to our local budgets, economies, and police department.

Immediate Relief for Our Communities

We demand rent cancellation, mortgage cancellation, a moratorium on utility and water shutoffs, and a cancellation of student, medical, and other forms of debt. We demand long-term economic solutions like a Universal Basic Income and Universal Healthcare in order to address the immediate crisis and pave the way for a just recovery that doesn’t prioritize corporations and leave our communities behind. Support the families and the lives of those we have lost and those struggling to survive now.

We, the co-signers of this letter, stand with protesters around the city and nation in demanding deep, systemic change for our communities’ fundamental rights to life. As we work in our practices to continue imagining a more just and equal world, we acknowledge the work that others have done throughout the centuries of our oppression. We amplify the calls for defunding the police and investing in our communities that now form the policy line of the overwhelming majority of us, your constituents.

We are of and for the people. We are only few of many who have no choice but to demand a better future. We will no longer be brushed aside.

sincerely,

This letter has now been signed by 1688 arts workers across New York City. [as of 6/7/20]

Lynnette Sauer, artist + arts administrator

To view the names + add your own if you are a fellow NYC arts worker, click here

art online: April 2020

1.

Two of my meditation drawings are included in Deep Blue See, an exhibition curated by Krista Scenna of Ground Floor Gallery in Park Slope, Brooklyn in partnership with Prevent Child Abuse America to raise awareness for Child Abuse Prevention Month during the month of April. [edit to update: show has been extended through June 1, 2020] I appreciate the gallery pointing out how work toward preventing child abuse is more important than ever at a time when people are staying home — home is not safe for everyone.

10% of sales from this exhibition will directly benefit Prevent Child Abuse America.

You can view the exhibition on Artsy:
> artsy.net/show/ground-floor-gallery-deep-blue-see-an-exhibition-for-child-abuse-prevention-month-2020

2.

An oil painting from all the way back in 2014 is included in the Spring Flash Showroom by the Equity Gallery in lower Manhattan. It takes imagery from the architecture along the canal that runs through downtown Indianapolis, IN during my time studying painting at the Herron School of Art + Design.

This online sale runs for one week from April 10 – 17th. [edit to update: show has been extended through April 30, 2020.]

You can view the exhibition on the NYAE website, or Artsy.
> nyartistsequity.org/the-spring-flash-showroom/lynnette-sauer-after-a-walk
> artsy.net/show/equity-gallery-the-new-york-artists-equity-spring-flash

perfect in weakness

Some details from a recently commissioned diptych:

+ a work in progress view on instagram

(details)
Perfect in Weakness, diptych, 36×24″, ink on paper/acrylic on paper, 2019

While working on the painting portion of this piece, I considered the way that small pieces (of the composition, of life) can feel out of place or broken, especially when observed from a place that is close-up and contained. With a more spacious point of view, there can be a perfection in observing the way things fit together that wasn’t previously apparent.

Continue reading “perfect in weakness”