end of semester / artist statement

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In seeking to better pay attention, the art principles of pattern and repetition emerge as useful tools. Much of our learning relates to the recognition of patterns, whether biological, aesthetic, mathematical, or otherwise. By pointing out things we may have missed the first or second (or third) time around, they help us to notice.

This work1 maps, tracks, and presents as evidence some of the repetitions in my life. It takes advantage of the power of pattern in several ways: as documentation, remembrance, meditation, points of empathy, and studies in aesthetics. The physical processes inherent in art-making demand that embodiment accompany mental-spiritual presence, and embodiment is always relational.

“I am stumbling in pursuit of grace2” – wholeness, healed-ness, holiness – for “out of wholeness we make good things.3

Out of wholeness, we love.


1some of it is here: lynnettetherese.com/portfolio
2Sarah Kay spoke this.
3Shauna Niequist tweeted this.

learning to see

The fall semester begins in two weeks and I’m trying to find a starting point/points for art-making this academic year. (It’s my last one, which means thesis time.) This is what I was thinking about/where I had landed by the time my end-of-semester review came around last spring.

learning to see // May 2015 | Lynnette Therese

I. new glasses

In first grade, I was prescribed glasses for the first time. As Mom drove us home in the green minivan, I remember raising and lowering the frames from my eyes and reveling in the newfound crispness as it passed by. There were trees and a field of tall grass and telephone wires, and all of a sudden this world of soft color had brand new sharp edges. Continue reading “learning to see”

the in-betweens

Appreciating the in-betweens seemed easier in Europe. Here I tend to move with calculation: settling into routes that are fastest, most efficient, most effective.

This summer, I rode high-speed trains and walked quickly but traveled with a spirit of slower awe, observing intensely the things around me, intending to see in a way that would do the surrounding beauty justice.

Noticing is an art, and art is rooted in practice. I’m still learning to see well.

A note to self:
Look up and around, notice.
Make observations of beauty part of your everyday.
Savor the in-betweens.

the in-betweens | Lynnette Therese

 

 

how to learn to paint

A lot of art education is process-oriented: if you want to paint, you have to pick up a brush. “Learning by doing.” Art history courses supplement this through their review of what has been considered great art over the centuries, the fundamental principles/elements of art and design, and the process of critical visual analysis. While these topics are all important, projected slides, textbook reproductions, and digital images simply can’t compare to experiencing art in person – when and where you can actually see the creative and technical processes as they originally unfolded.

I don’t know how to describe the feeling of standing inches away from some of the greatest paintings I’ve ever seen, noticing nuances in color and brushwork that I didn’t know existed. Or of taking in works of art created hundreds of years ago by someone who is a fellow artist, whose drive to create beauty gives us common ground in spite of the centuries that separate us.

It’s overwhelming, mysterious, beautiful, and proves to me again that art is powerful.

If you want to learn to paint, I think it’s absolutely necessary to spend time breathing the same air as the works that inspire you. See, appreciate, understand, disagree, wonder, feel. And then: create.

how to learn to paint | Lynnette Therese

countdown: 3

A lot has happened in the past three weeks. Since last time:

All final projects have been turned in and spring semester grades are posted

countdown: 3 | Lynnette Therese

I cleaned out my space in the junior painting studio

countdown: 3 | Lynnette Therese

I re-signed my lease, my current roommate moved out, a new roommate moved in, and we found someone to stay here over the summer while we’re both traveling

countdown: 3 | Lynnette Therese Continue reading “countdown: 3”