Observations and thoughts at the Pergamonmuseum

First art history class blog post, from Berlin.

Herron Study Abroad

Post by Lynnette Sauer

When approaching this museum (and, from what it seems, all of the Museuminsel museums), the overall impression is that everything is grand. From the architectural appearance of the building itself to the fact that there are reconstructions 60-70 feet tall. There is a huge, beautiful tiled arch — mostly blue tile, with gold and teal accents, and animals: slightly protruding in more textural brick (Ishtar Gate of Babylon). Upon proceeding through the gate, you arrive within a room of anient Roman architecture and sculpture which is my favorite part of the museum — I have never seen life-size Roman columns, and to see these beautiful Corinthian pillars on a two-story, 60 or 70 foot wall is a bit overwhelming. In a good way.

After the room of Roman architecture and sculpture comes the Permanon Altar room: the related frieses are also quite amazing in their grandeur…

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I M P R E S S I O N S

I M P R E S S I O N S | Lynnette Therese

I love the active brushwork and sensitivity to color that happened in the impressionist and post-impressionist periods of art history. Impressionism was all about capturing light, color, and movement in a way that was true to the human experience of sight, turning away from painting tradition in an attempt to create images that more accurately reflected the brevity, energy, and complexity of everyday moments. Life is that way, and I think that’s why impressionist art is compelling to so many people.

A few of my favorite moments from the Impressionism Gallery at the Art Institute of Chicago. Courtesy of Renoir, Monet, Morisot, Cross, Manet, Van Gogh, and Monticelli:

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