Fine Lines

This spring, I worked with Etta and Aaron (both seniors in the printmaking department) to create our joint thesis show, entitled Fine Lines. Completing a painting thesis at Herron includes several elements: an exhibition, oral review, and paper; the pieces displayed at Fine Lines represent several years of (conceptual and visual) idea development. Creating this show helped bring together components of my art practice which I’d previously seen as separate and difficult to reconcile. It provided space to consider the works in relationship to each other, the typically unseen elements of my art-making process, and real people who interacted with them. In the end, this portion of the thesis work was simply an extension of the rest of my years of Herron – art as process, as teacher, as connector.

The photos / statements below recap the visual part of my thesis work as seen at our show, which took place on April 15, 2016 at The Oilwick.


Fine Lines | Lynnette Therese Sauer

Show Statement: Marietta Miller, Aaron Green and Lynnette Sauer’s thesis exhibition is a celebration of line in drawing, printmaking, and painting.  The work is thematically varied but unified by their love of mark making. Fine Lines references the idiom “There is a fine line between x and y.” It is in the fragile in-between, the gray areas, that Marietta, Aaron, and Lynnette find inspiration for their work.

IMG_6256 Continue reading “Fine Lines”

books (2015)

In 2015, I read these.

  • Still: Notes on a Mid-Faith Crisis, Lauren F. Winner
  • Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration, Ed Catmull
  • The Endurance: Shackleton’s Legendary Antarctic Expedition, Caroline Alexander
  • Great by Choice, Jim Collins
  • The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis
  • The Prince, Niccolò Machiavelli (translated by W.K. Marriott)
  • The Contrarian’s Guide to Leadership, Steven B. Sample
  • One Thing You Can’t Do In Heaven, Mark Cahill
  • Prince Caspian, C.S. Lewis
  • The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, C.S. Lewis
  • Defining Moments: When Managers Must Choose Between Right and Right, Joseph L. Badaracco, Jr.
  • The Agility Factor: Building Adaptable Organizations for Superior Performance, Christopher G. Worley
  • The Silver Chair, C.S. Lewis
  • How Will You Measure Your Life?, Clayton M. Christensen
  • The Horse and His Boy, C.S. Lewis
  • The Secret Sharer, Joseph Conrad
  • The Luminous and the Grey, David Batchelor
  • The Magician’s Nephew, C.S. Lewis
  • Mudhouse Sabbath, Lauren F. Winner
  • The Last Battle, C.S. Lewis
  • A Prayer Journal, Flannery O’Connor
  • The Chosen, Chaim Potok
  • Tenth of December, George Saunders
  • Wearing God: Clothing, Laughter, Fire, and Other Overlooked Ways of Meeting God, Lauren F. Winner
  • The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoyevsky (translated by Constance Garnett)
  • The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, Marie Kondo (translated by Cathy Hirano)
  • Tuesdays with Morrie, Mitch Albom
  • Don’t Waste Your Life, John Piper
  • To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
  • ART/WORK, Heather Darcy Bhandari and Jonathan Melber
  • A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories, Flannery O’Connor
  • Paper Towns, John Green
  • Girl With a Pearl Earring, Tracy Chevalier
  • Real Sex: The Naked Truth about Chastity, Lauren F. Winner
  • Help My Unbelief: Why Doubt is Not the Enemy of Faith, Barnabas Piper
  • Beauty Looks After Herself, Eric Gill
  • The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, Carson McCullers
  • Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship, Claire Bishop
  • Curationism: How Curating Took Over the Art World and Everything Else, David Balzer
  • About Looking, John Berger
  • Earthen Vessels: Why Our Bodies Matter to Our Faith, Matthew Lee Anderson
  • Minding the Body, Patricia Foster (editor)
  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Betty Smith
  • The Lipstick Gospel, Stephanie May Wilson
  • The Abolition of Man, C.S. Lewis
  • One Thousand Gifts: A Dare to Live Fully Right Where You Are, Ann Voskamp
  • Gilead, Marilynne Robinson
  • The Best American Short Stories 2006, Ann Patchett (editor)
  • Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe
  • Till We Have Faces, C.S. Lewis
  • Walking on Water: Reflections on Faith and Art, Madeleine L’Engle
  • The Promise, Chaim Potok
  • Jesus Feminist: An Invitation to Revisit the Bible’s View of Women, Sarah Bessey
  • African Art, Frank Willett
  • The Princess and the Goblin, George MacDonald
  • The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks & Win Your Inner Creative Battles, Steven Pressfield
  • Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, Susan Cain
  • Nejma, Nayyirah Waheed
  • Archive Fever: A Freudian Impression, Jacques Derrida (translated by Eric Prenowitz)
  • The Princess and Curdie, George MacDonald
  • A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, James Joyce
  • The Valley of Vision: A Collection of Puritan Prayers and Devotions, Arthur Bennett (editor)
  • Searching for Sunday: Loving, Leaving, and Finding the Church, Rachel Held Evans
  • The Writing Life, Annie Dillard
  • Women, Art, and Society, Whitney Chadwick
  • The Glass Castle, Jeannette Walls
  • Marjorie Main: Rural Documentary Poetry, John Sherman
  • Go Set a Watchman, Harper Lee
  • the Bible (English Standard Version)

books (2015)

To those who shaped this list by your generously loaned or gifted books, recommendations, and willingness to read with me – thank you!

 

countdown: 3

A lot has happened in the past three weeks. Since last time:

All final projects have been turned in and spring semester grades are posted

countdown: 3 | Lynnette Therese

I cleaned out my space in the junior painting studio

countdown: 3 | Lynnette Therese

I re-signed my lease, my current roommate moved out, a new roommate moved in, and we found someone to stay here over the summer while we’re both traveling

countdown: 3 | Lynnette Therese Continue reading “countdown: 3”

Thoughts on Habits (Part One)

Over fall break, I read the book Maximize Your Potential. In the form of essays, Q&A’s, and famous quotes, it’s a collection of thoughts on how to be a creative professional in today’s world – in the best way possible.

Thoughts on Habits (Part One) | Lynnette Therese

One essay in particular stuck with me: it’s entitled “Reprogramming Your Daily Habits” and was written by Scott Young. In it, he covers the topics of productivity, progress, and achieving goals.

His premise is that when we realize that willpower is not an infinite source of energy, forming good habits makes a lot more sense – it becomes crucial. If we can ‘automate’ certain basic behaviors, we have more energy to expend on things that are new, require more effort, or are more important to us. The two principles he suggests implementing when building habits are focus and consistency.

Thoughts on Habits (Part One) | Lynnette Therese

Focus

Young points out that many people, when deciding to make life changes, try to implement them all at once – only to sputter and fail after a few weeks. I’ve experienced this – many times – myself, and it is unendingly frustrating. He argues that this method depends entirely on willpower instead of harnessing the power of habit. How to fix the problem? Focus on constructing one habit at a time (Young suggests spending around a month before moving to the next habit). “Some people might see this approach as being prohibitively slow, but in practice, doing habits one month at a time is fast.” Making 12 life-improving habits (e.g. healthy sleeping habits, reading for pleasure, cutting back on excess internet time, exercising daily) a reality could (really) change your life over the course of a year. How’s that for food for thought?

Consistency

Principle #2 is to approach habit-building with consistency: “by making the habit you’re working on extremely consistent, you speed up the time it takes to make the behavior automatic.” Again, I see where I’ve done just the opposite (and failed to make lasting habits). It’s much easier, much more ‘convenient’ when workouts, reading time, or seven hours of sleep happen whenever I can fit them in. When I try to do so, however, it seems that more often than not this leads to things not fitting into my day – getting pushed to the next, and then the next… you get the picture: good intentions + lack of consistency = failed execution.

In summary:

  1. Habits are powerful.
  2. So, use them with intention.

I love goals and plans and big ideas. I have a lot of ideas about the way I’d like my life to look, and many of these ideas are not very well (or not at all) integrated into my ‘real life’. This essay was a helpful and instructive way for me to view the actions and thoughts I make (or keep from becoming) habits in my life.

Thoughts on Habits (Part One) | Lynnette Therese

Maximize Your Potential was edited by Jocelyn K. Glei for 99U. For more information, click here.