Remembering Rome and the Origin of Beauty

Remember that one time we almost didn’t see the Sistine Chapel? (It’s a fun story.)

“That one time” happened less than three days ago and now I’m up at 7:30am-feels-like-1:30pm, 20 hours of travel removed from Rome and it kind of doesn’t feel real.

But, it was. And it was so worth it because the Sistine Chapel was perhaps the most overwhelmingly beautiful thing I have ever observed. The paintings – oh! yes, the paintings; but also the deep commitment among the men who took it from idea to reality, and the weight of the fact that I know this God whose story is laid out so beautifully before the eyes of thousands of people every day. I know this God and he’s infinitely more beautiful than even the grandest examples of human creation. He’s the origin. I, a self-supposed lover of Beauty, forget that far too often.

Standing, eyes upward, in the chapel with these things in my head, it was all I could do not to weep for the sheer too-big-for-words beauty of it all. In the end, sure, it would have been sad to visit Rome and miss the Sistine Chapel, but it’s heartbreaking to consider a life without any acknowledgement of ultimate Beauty.

(Psalm 27:4)
One thing I have asked of the Lord,
that will I seek after:
that I may dwell in the house of the Lord
all the days of my life,
to gaze upon the beauty of the Lord
and to inquire in his temple.

Amen.

Remembering Rome and the Origin of Beauty | Lynnette Therese
Photo: Getty Images via The Huffington Post

Observations and thoughts at the Pergamonmuseum

First art history class blog post, from Berlin.

Herron Study Abroad

Post by Lynnette Sauer

When approaching this museum (and, from what it seems, all of the Museuminsel museums), the overall impression is that everything is grand. From the architectural appearance of the building itself to the fact that there are reconstructions 60-70 feet tall. There is a huge, beautiful tiled arch — mostly blue tile, with gold and teal accents, and animals: slightly protruding in more textural brick (Ishtar Gate of Babylon). Upon proceeding through the gate, you arrive within a room of anient Roman architecture and sculpture which is my favorite part of the museum — I have never seen life-size Roman columns, and to see these beautiful Corinthian pillars on a two-story, 60 or 70 foot wall is a bit overwhelming. In a good way.

After the room of Roman architecture and sculpture comes the Permanon Altar room: the related frieses are also quite amazing in their grandeur…

View original post 265 more words